The Rushmore Report: The Best Marriage Advice I Ever Heard


You hear a lot of marriage advice before you get married. “Keep a date night.” “Never go to bed angry.” “Make the relationship your first priority.” “Don’t walk out during an argument.” But of all the counsel my husband and I received before our wedding day, one thought has proven to be the most challenging and transformative, and it came from my father-in-law.

A gifted pastor and teacher, he was the only person we could imagine officiating our wedding. During the final preparations for the ceremony, we sat across a table from him in a small restaurant to discuss the details: who was responsible for what, when would everyone arrive, which Bible verses had we chosen to use, and who would be reading them. Somewhere between the end of our meal and the waitress returning a receipt to be signed, we asked him what advice he had for us. He paused, smiled, and looked down for a moment to thoughtfully consider his response. His eyes shot back up and looked directly at us as he simply said, “Forgive quickly.”

I had enough self-awareness on that day to know this would not come easily to me. If there was ever a place where I would feel justified to harbor bitterness and keep a tab on the ways I had been wronged, it would be within marriage. Where else would I share such a wide array of intimate moments with one person? Space, money, parenting responsibilities, highs, lows, personal time, a bed . . . becoming “one” is about more than sex. It requires a level of vulnerability that opens the door for deep hurt, and letting go of those wounds was going to require more change than I would like to submit to.

What forgiveness means

It is rare for me to be without words, especially when I am upset. In the first year of our marriage, we struggled to resolve arguments because of my need to say “just one more thing.” With each additional statement, I churned up the dirt and pulled out new arguments that were both painful and unproductive. I thought I’d feel better by presenting every offense of which I thought my husband was guilty; and if I felt better, I could forgive. If I felt better, I could let it go. In time, I learned that feelings of forgiveness follow the choice to forgive.

My son plays a game that teaches him new words and their definitions. I was recently struck by the explanation it provided for the word forgive. “When you forgive someone, you stop being angry.” To my surprise, the Webster definition also speaks to a change in feelings preceding the act of forgiveness – a far cry from the biblical depiction. Rather, in Scripture we find that forgiveness is an action made in the midst of negative feelings, making it a beautiful expression of love.

About the Author

Cara Joyner writes on Christian marriage, and is regularly featured in Today’s Christian Woman.


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