Posts

Continental Army Established – 242 Years Ago Today

On this day in history, 1775, The Continental Army was established by the Continental Congress, marking the birth of the United States Army. This happened after the outbreak of the American Revolutionary War. The Army was created to coordinate the military efforts of the 13 colonies in their revolt against the rule of Great Britain. The Continental Army was supplemented by local militias and other troops that remained under control of the individual states. General George Washington was the commander-in-chief of the army throughout the war.

Most of the Continental Army was disbanded in 1783 after the Treaty of Paris ended the war. The 1st and 2nd Regiments went on to form the nucleus of the Legion of the United States in 1792 under General Anthony Wayne. This became the foundation of the United States Army in 1796.

The United States Army has a rich and glorious history. So find a military person today and tell them “Thank you.” And “Happy Birthday.”

 

 

The Rushmore Report: My Advice to President Trump

President Donald Trump has hit the 150-day mark of his administration. He has much to show for it – an acclaimed Supreme Court Justice, a record Dow Jones, a lower unemployment rate than was seen at any point of the Obama Administration. Still, many of his priorities are stalled – a budget and healthcare reform to just name two. So what does the president need to do to move the ball forward? What can he do to become truly successful? I offer a blueprint for success, proven to work by great presidents who preceded Mr. Trump. Mr. President, you should do seven things.

1. Stop tweeting.

Or at least, run your tweets past your communications team. Yes, your tweets connect you with the American people in an instant. But you have proven, Mr. President, that you cannot tweet without stepping on your own message. So far, you have been two presidents – the one who has taken decisive action to advance your agenda, and the one who tweets off-message on a daily basis. If you want your agenda to be heard, lose your Twitter account – now.

2. Put extreme vetting in place and move beyond the travel ban fiasco.

You said you wanted extreme vetting for a few designated countries. That made sense when you said it and it makes sense today. Unfortunately, your plan has been overturned by every court that has heard it. Now it is before the Supreme Court. But here’s the problem, Mr. President. You told us you needed 100 days to put procedures of extreme vetting in place. That was 150 days ago. Nothing has happened that kept you from doing this. If you had done in those 100 days what you said you needed 100 days to do, this would all go away. And every day extreme vetting and the travel ban are in the news is just another day your other initiatives will go nowhere.

3. Work with moderate Democrats.

Get to know Sen. Joe Manchin of West Virginia. He is the most right-leaning Democrat in the Senate. But he’s not alone. There are 12 Democratic senators from states you carried in 2016 who are up for re-election next year. Be their friend. Work with them. Many of them will support your budget ideas and much of your healthcare plan. After the last eight years, when President Obama did nothing to work with Republicans, any move toward unity you make will be magnified. And it makes for good politics.

4. Follow the Reagan blueprint.

In his article, Why Ronald Reagan’s Example Is Still Relevant for America Today, Ben T. Elliot reminds us that President Reagan did four things well. First, he united America. Second, he inspired America. Third, he emboldened America. And fourth, he protected America. What worked for President Reagan, Mr. Trump, will still work today.

5. Stay focused.

When you think of great presidents, you think of less, not more. Take Harry Truman, for example. One of the most unpopular presidents in American history – during his time in office – Truman did one thing really well. With laser focus, Truman was committed to ending – and winning – World War II. Similarly, Reagan won the Cold War, FDR ended the Depression, Lincoln reunified the nation, Jackson brought about major American expansion, and Wilson ended World War I and formed the League of Nations. Great presidents stay focused. They do a few things well.

6. Limit your personal attacks.

Mr. President, study Abe Lincoln on this one. He famously said, “The best way to beat your enemy is to make him your friend.” Following the heated election of 1860, Lincoln named his three top opponents to his cabinet. Consider JFK 100 years later. He named his bitter rival, Lyndon Johnson, as VP. Embrace your adversaries. If Ronald Reagan could work with Tip O’Neil and Bill Clinton could work with Newt Gingrich, you can work with Nancy Pelosi. Ok, that might be a stretch – but it’s worth the effort.

7. Own your administration’s mistakes and share your successes.

It’s a key principle of leadership. Own the mistake and share the credit. The classic example is that of President Reagan. He once followed the advice of Gen. Colin Powell, who served in his administration. That particular advice resulted in the loss of a dozen American soldiers. When asked why he took the action he took, the President glanced back at Gen. Powell, then said, “It was a horrible miscalculation, but it was my mistake alone. I take full responsibility for what happened.” Hearing the president own the blame, Powell turned to a man standing next to him and whispered, “I’ll die for that man,” pointing at Mr. Reagan.

Rarely have there been more trying times to be a president. And the Democrats and media certainly aren’t doing anything to help, Mr. Trump. But you still have the bully pulpit. You have nearly four more years to make a difference. And you have the power to make a wonderful, historic difference. So, with all the fake humility I can muster, Mr. President, I suggest my seven recommendations are right. Follow this blueprint and you will be successful.

More importantly, America will be successful. You can make America great again. But you need to hurry, because you have less time left in your presidency than ever. As Yogi Berra used to say, “It’s getting late early.”

You can do this, Mr. President. Ronald Reagan’s vision of America as the “shining city on a hill” can still come to fruition. America can be great again. But more than anyone else’s, it’s in your hands. We’re pulling for you.

Televised Watergate Hearings Begin – 44 Years Ago Today

It’s hard to believe it’s been 44 years. On this day in 1973, a U.S. Senate committee headed by Senator James “Sam” Erwin of North Carolina began televised hearings on the June 1972 break-in at the Watergate office complex in Washington, D.C. The Senate Select Committee on Presidential Campaign Activities was investigating the incident at which police had arrested five men for the unlawful entry to the Democratic National Committee headquarters, where they installed illegal wiretapping equipment.

Information obtained from the wiretaps would have been useful to those who wanted to assist President Richard Nixon in obtaining a second term in office. Erwin’s folksy approach, combined with his extensive knowledge of the law and the Constitution, made him an ideal choice to head the controversial investigation. The Senate hearings gripped the nation, especially when former White House counsel John Dean testified that Nixon himself had been aware of the crime and subsequent cover-up. Nixon resigned the presidency on August 3, 1974, rather than face impeachment and removal from office.

Here’s the lesson. No man is above the law. And when we break the law – man’s or God’s – there is always a price to pay. From Richard Nixon we know this: we choose our actions, but not the consequences.

Looking Back – OKC Bombing, Lessons Learned

It happened 22 years ago today. Timothy McVeigh and Terry Nichols blew up the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City, killing 168 people, while injuring 680 others. Their motive was to retaliate for the wrongs of the sieges of Ruby Ridge and Waco.

The blast destroyed or damaged 324 buildings within a 16-block radius, shattering glass in 258 nearby buildings, and destroying or burning 86 cars. This was the deadliest terrorist attack on American soil in history to that point.

What are the lessons from the Oklahoma City bombing? I see three.

1. Evil still persists in the world – and that includes America. This should come as no surprise. The Bible is clear. In the end times, things will get worse, not better. The enemy is still at work, man’s heart is still desperately wicked, and evil is still with us.

2. God has created man with a free will. Could God have stopped the bombing? Of course He could have. But we are not robots. We all make daily choices to do good or evil. That is what makes God’s relationship with His children so special. We enter into our relationships with God by choice.

3. Judgement will always come. Man picks his choices, but not the consequences. God always gets the last word. There used to be a preacher named R.G. Lee. He preached one sermon thousands of times. It was called “Payday Someday.” Lee made the point that justice always prevails – eventually.

All in One Day

It all happened in one day – April 3.

April 3, 1860 – The first successful Unites States Pony Express run from Saint Joseph, Missouri, to Sacramento, California, begins.

April 3, 1865 – In the Civil War, Union forces capture Richmond, Virginia, the capital of the Confederate States of America, signaling an end to the war between the states.

April 3, 1882 – In the American old west, outlaw Jesse James is killed by Robert Ford. (Some claimed he actually escaped and died in Texas some 40 years later.)

April 3, 1948 – President Harry S. Truman signs the Marshall Plan, authorizing $5 billion in aid for 16 different countries.

April 3, 1968 – Civil rights leader Martin Luther King, Jr., delivers his famous “I’ve Been to the Mountaintop” speech, shortly before his assassination.

A lot can happen in a day. And on this day in history – April 3 – a lot has happened. But this particular April 3 has never come this way before, and it will never return to us again. So go out and make today the best April 3 you ever had.

A lot can happen – in one day.

John and Abigail Adams’ Letters – This Day in 1777

On March 7, 1777, Continental Congressman John Adams wrote three letters to his wife, Abigail. On that same day, he received two letters from her. Mr. Adams was with the Congress in Philadelphia, while she maintained their farm in Braintree, Massachusetts. The remarkable correspondence between John and Abigail – numbering 1,160 letters in total – covered topics ranging from politics and military strategy to household economy and family health.

But these letters went far deeper than that. Their mutual respect and adoration for each other served as evidence that even in an age when women were unable to vote, there were marriages in which wives and husbands were true intellectual and emotional equals.

In the second letter John drafted to Abigail on this day, he declared that Philadelphia had lost its vibrancy during Congress’ removal to Baltimore, and he described Loyalists as “sordid Scoundrels.” In the letters from Abigail, written in February of 1777, she bemoaned the lack of military fervor demonstrated by the New Englanders around her.

These amazing treasures tell us a lot about what made our second president tick. These five letters, along with 1,155 others, remind us that behind every good man is patriotism, courage – and a good wife.

Miracle on Ice

Mike Eruzione – have you ever heard of him?

Let me help. Mike was born in Winthrop, Massachusetts, on October 25, 1944. At 5 feet 10 and 180 pounds, he was not an imposing athlete, even in his prime. A college hockey player, his dream was to play in the NHL. But he was drafted by the WHA, not the NHL. The WHA (World Hockey Association) was a fledgling league that never competed successfully with the NHL. And Mike never even made it to the WHA. His professional career played out in the minor hockey leagues of the IHL and AHL, where he played left wing for the Toledo Goaldiggers and Philadelphia Firebirds. He was cut from the Firebirds in 1980, and his professional career was over.

But that’s where history begins.

Because Eruzione was no longer a pro, he could try out for the American amateur hockey team, going against college players for a spot on the team. Mike made the team and was elected captain, based on his seasoned age in the midst of players barely out of high school.

That amateur hockey team is better known as the Olympic team. They played in Lake Placid, New York. It was there that the unthinkable became reality – 37 years ago today.

In the medal round, or semi-finals, the American team came up against the vaunted Russian team, many of whom were NHL All-Stars and award-winning veterans. It was the ultimate David vs. Goliath.

On this day, David won.

It was never supposed to happen. This would be like a mid-level college football team beating Tom Brady and the New England Patriots. The American team beating the Russians and then winning the gold medal (which they did two days later) would be the ultimate feel-good story.

And yet, it happened.

In the final period, the scored was tied, 3-3. Then Mike Eruzione scored the winning goal. And at the sound of the final horn, legendary broadcaster Al Michaels asked, “Do you believe in miracles?” And the term “Miracle on Ice” was birthed.

You know the names of the greats of American sports history: Ruth, Ali, Jordan, and Unitas. But you didn’t know Mike Eruzione’s name.

And here’s the lesson – country above person. That’s it. We remember that the Americans beat the Russians. We don’t care who scored the winning goal. Credit goes to the team.

And that’s how it should be. When one man becomes bigger than the team or country, we have lost our way. “Miracle on Ice” will live forever in the hearts and minds of all who were of age in 1980. The names may be forgotten, but not the event. For that one day on ice, 37 years ago, America was #1.

That’s all that mattered then. And that’s all that matters now.

Bess Truman Is Born – 1885

Elizabeth Virginia “Bess” Wallace was born in Independence, Missouri, on this day in 1885. An unassuming woman who died in 1982, Bess was best known as the wife of Harry S. Truman, the 33rd president of the United States. From the time her husband entered politics in 1922, she was active in her role as his wife and future first lady, while raising Margaret, the couple’s only child.

Harry Truman, who was Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s fourth vice president, became president in 1945, following FDR’s death, and then was elected to another term in 1948. It was the said around the White House that the Trumans were the most tight-knit family ever to live there – although for three of their presidential years, they lived in the Blair House while the interior of the White House was gutted and repaired. Bess had insisted that the historic residence be carefully renovated, instead of being replaced.

The Bible promises a new home for us in heaven. And unlike the White House, it is in no need of renovation.

The Rushmore Report: 25 Fun Facts from Past Presidential Inaugurations

Friday, Donald John Trump will take the oath of office as the 45th President of the United States. This brings to mind 25 fun facts of inaugurations past. Do you know who the youngest president was? The oldest? Who was the first to be sworn into office in Washington, D.C.? Who gave the longest speech? Whose was shortest? Keep reading!

Here are 25 fun facts of presidential inauguration history.

1. In 1953, Texas-born Dwight D. Eisenhower was lassoed in the reviewing stand by a cowboy who rode up to him on a horse.

2. JFK’s inauguration almost went up in flames when the podium caught fire as Cardinal Richard Cushing was delivering the invocation.

3. One of the most awkward moments of inauguration history occurred in 2009, when Chief Justice John Roberts flubbed the oath during Obama’s public ceremony – putting the word “faithfully” in the wrong place. It was a small slip of the tongue, but since it raised concerns that Obama may not have been properly sworn in, they repeated the 35 words, in the right order, in private the next day at the White House.

4. The most botched oath goes to Lyndon Johnson, who took the vice-presidential oath during JFK’s inauguration “without any mental reservation whatever,” instead of “without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion.”

5. Jimmy Carter took his inauguration in stride when he walked from the Capitol to the White House in the ceremony parade. (The only other president to do so was Thomas Jefferson.)

6. Abraham Lincoln’s inauguration became so wild that the police had to be called in.

7. Thomas Jefferson was the first president to be sworn into office in Washington, D.C.

8. Theodore Roosevelt – not John F. Kennedy – was the youngest man inaugurated into office, at 42 years of age.

9. Ronald Reagan was our oldest president to take office, just 17 days short of his 70th birthday.

10. Bill Clinton’s second inauguration was the first to be live-streamed on the Internet.

11. Bill and Hillary Clinton attended a record 14 inaugural balls.

12. While tickets for this year’s ball are being scalped for as much as $12,500, the 400 tickets to James Madison’s celebration went for just $4 each.

13. William Henry Harrison gave the longest speech – 100 minutes – in a snowstorm. (He got sick and died a month later.)

14. The shortest speech was given by George Washington – just 135 words.

15. The only president to kiss the Bible as he was sworn in was George Washington.

16. Washington was the only president to ad lib his oath of office, ending it with “so help me God,” setting a precedent for future presidents.

17. Teddy Roosevelt went off script when he concluded his oath with “And thus I swear.”

18. John Quincy Adams was the first of three presidents to not use the Bible while being sworn in, opting to place his hand on a constitutional law volume instead.

19. John Quincy was also the one to break the dress code mold – opting to wear trousers instead of the traditional knee breeches.

20. An estimated 1.2 million people attended Lyndon Johnson’s inauguration. (President Obama drew 1.8 million in 2009.)

21. In 1909 William Taft was sworn into office as nearly 10 inches of snow fell – still an inauguration snowfall record.

22. Franklin Roosevelt’s second inauguration in 1937 was the rainiest – 1.77 inches.

23. James Buchanan’s inauguration in 1857 was the first to be photographed.

24. Robert Frost became the first inaugural poet when he spoke at John F. Kennedy’s swearing in.

25. The most expensive inauguration was Barack Obama’s in 2009, with a bill of more than $150 million, two thirds of which was financed by private donors.

The Birth of Alexander Hamilton

He was one of America’s most influential early statesmen and the nation’s first Secretary of the Treasury. I’m talking about Alexander Hamilton. If you see him today, wish him happy birthday. He is 260 years old today.

Hamilton was quite a fellow. In 1787, as a New York delegate to the Constitutional Convention, he pushed for a strong central government, an idea to which he was committed throughout his life. As co-author of The Federalist Papers, along with James Madison and John Jay, Hamilton was the most staunch supporter of a republican form of government. The Federalist Papers ran in newspapers for over a year, when the states, still governed by the Articles of Confederation, were debating whether to ratify the proposed document.

On July 11, 1804, Hamilton was fatally wounded in a duel with former vice president Aaron Burr after a long and bitter feud. Three years earlier, Hamilton’s son Philip, had met the same fate on the very same hill in Weehawken, New Jersey.

Next week, we inaugurate our 45th president, arguably the most controversial man to ever fill this highest office. The 2016 election has brought a level of incivility like most of us have never seen. But as we look back, we can see we really have come a long way.

Whether you ascribe to the theory that America needs to be great again, or we already are, we can all agree we have come a long way. I can’t remember the last time a vice president killed a member of the president’s cabinet with a sword.