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The Rushmore Report – Five Highlights from Barbara Bush’s Funeral

It was one of the most beautiful funerals I’ve ever seen. By the time it was over, I was wiping tears from both eyes. I’m talking, of course, of the celebratory homecoming of Barbara Bush, dubbed “the first lady of the greatest generation” by historian Jon Meacham in his inspiring eulogy. Held at St. Martin’s Episcopal Church, where the Bushes have been active members for half a century, the service encapsulated all that is good about America. Let’s review five highlights of this awesome service.

1. President Bush’s socks

The former president ordered a pair of crazy looking socks – his trademark – covered with images of books, from John’s Crazy Socks store. The point, of course, was to honor Mrs. Bush’s commitment to literacy. After the service, Mr. Bush donated the socks to a young fan of his presidency – a man with Down Syndrome.

2. Granddaughters’ Bible reading

Six grandchildren – all women – each read a passage from Proverbs 31, which begins with, “Her children rise up and call her blessed; her husband too, and he praises her. Many women have done excellently, but you surpass them all.” This was a fitting tribute for the only First Lady in American history to be married for 73 years.

3. President Bush at the casket

The day before the service, 8,000 Houstonians filed by the casket at the front of St. Martin’s sanctuary. In typical Bush form, the former president sat there for an hour, in his wheelchair, to greet well-wishers. But first, he had his time alone, before the casket. It was an image of devotion and grace that will not be  forgotten.

4. Jeb Bush’s eulogy

The former Governor of Florida became emotional as he talked about his mom. He said, “We learned to be genuine and authentic by the best role model in the world.” Jeb then spoke of the woman who ran the family that ran the country in terms that clearly moved the hearts of the 1,500 invited guests.

5. Barbara’s personal faith

Jeb described the faith of his mother. He said that during his final visit with Barbara, he asked about her feelings about facing death. She said, “Jeb, I believe in Jesus and he is my Savior. I don’t want to leave your dad, but I know I’ll be in a beautiful place.” The family pastor, Rev. Russell J. Levenson, Jr, confirmed Barbara’s amazing faith. The rector at St. Martin’s told of her confirmation at the age of 90, as well as his private conversation with her three days before her death. “Clearly, she was ready,” said Levenson.

 

The Rushmore Report – The Top 50 Christian Universities in America

Picking a good university to attend involves many factors: your major, cost, location, and the culture of the university and its campus. I can make a great recommendation – Houston Baptist University. I’ve never known a finer institution. But setting all bias aside, here is a Top 50 list, via Anna Rebekah Orr.

1. College of the Ozarks (Point Lookout, Missouri)

2. Wheaton College (Wheaton, Illinois)

3. Whitworth University (Spokane, Washington)

4. Messiah College (Harrisburg, Pennsylvania)

5. Grove City College (Grove City, Pennsylvania)

6. Calvin College (Grand Rapids, Michigan)

7. Taylor University (Upland, Indiana)

8. Union University (Jackson, Tennessee)

9. Cedarville University (near Cleveland, Ohio)

10. Asbury University (Wilmore, Kentucky)

11. Abilene Christian University (Abilene, Texas)

12. Corban University (Salem, Oregon)

13. Point Loma Nazarene University (San Diego, California)

14. Eastern University (Saint Davids, Pennsylvania)

15. Milligan College (Milligan College, Tennessee)

16. Northwestern College (Orange City, Iowa)

17. Westmont College (Santa Barbara, California)

18. Dordt College (Sioux Center, Iowa)

19. Hope International University (Fullerton, California)

20. Greenville College (Greenville, Illinois)

21. Bethel College (Mishawaka, Indiana)

22. Seattle Pacific University (Seattle, Washington)

23. George Fox University (Newberg, Oregon)

24. Lipscomb University (Nashville, Tennessee)

25. Azusa Pacific University (Azusa, California)

26. North Park University (Chicago, Illinois)

27. Geneva College (Beaver Falls, Pennsylvania)

28. Bethel University (St. Paul, Minnesota)

29. Houghton College (Houghton, New York)

30. Dallas Baptist University (Dallas, Texas)

31. Simpson University (Redding, California)

32. Gordon College (Wenham, Massachusetts)

33. Roberts Wesleyan College (Rochester, New York)

34. Huntington University (Huntington, Indiana)

35. Liberty University (Lynchburg, Virginia)

36. Anderson University (Anderson, Indiana)

37. Biola University (La Mirada, California)

38. Fresno Pacific University (Fresno, California)

39. Northwest University (Kirkland, Washington)

40. The Master’s College & Seminary (Santa Clarita, California)

41. Midamerica Nazarene University (Olathe, Kansas)

42. LeTourneau University (Longview, Texas)

43. John Brown University (Siloam Springs, Arkansas)

44. Mount Vernon Nazarene University (Mount Vernon, Ohio)

45. Oral Roberts University (Tulsa, Oklahoma)

46. Concordia University (Irvine, California)

47. Oklahoma Christian University (Oklahoma City, Oklahoma)

48. Bob Jones University (Greenville, South Carolina)

49. Trinity Christian College (Palos Heights, Illinois)

50. Spring Arbor University (Spring Arbor, Michigan)

About the Author

Anna Rebekah Orr writes for Christian Universities Online.

The Rushmore Report – The Disengaged Are Destroying America

There is no shortage of emotion on the part of the two-thirds of American adults who harbor strong feelings about the condition and direction of the country. During the past decade, in particular, activist conservatives and liberals have been feverishly pushing their ideals and desires for the nation in full view of the public. The clash of worldviews represented by those two factions has created something that feels like an angry stalemate in which America is not making any progress. Some have called it a (mostly) non-violent civil war. We are definitely in a time of agitation, desperately seeking resolution.

Recent studies by the American Culture and Faith Institute have noted that no matter how you measure it, people are eager to arrive at new solutions because we are leery of our own government.

Six out of ten Americans are angry about the state of the nation. Two out of three contend that the government cannot be trusted to do what is in the best interests of the country. Seventy percent say that government has too much control over our lives. Huge majorities of the people argue that the United States is moving in the wrong direction on at least three important fronts: politically, morally, and culturally.

So if we are in a democratic republic, why aren’t things changing for the better?

One reason is that we lack leadership that is coalescing the people around a positive, shared vision of America. We experience that paucity of leadership everyday, as Democrats and Republicans, liberals and conservatives, Christians and non-Christians, Millennials and Boomers, whites and non-whites express their divergent perspectives and refuse to give an inch. Without strong leaders casting a compelling portrait of a superior future and showing us how we can move forward, that existing animosity will not end.

But another crucial component of our national stalemate is the large share of the voting-age population that is disengaged from the multifaceted battle of worldviews. These people are the tiebreakers. But they refuse to show up.

There are two key segments of the disengaged. The first is those who have moderate views – i.e., obstinate ambivalence – on both politics and theology (31% of the adult population). They will not take stands on the important issues of the day, from immigration to abortion, from the veracity of the Bible to the role of Jesus Christ in modern life.

The second segment is people who are not registered to vote and pay little attention to political news and information (21%). There are times when all of us get frustrated with the political system and its players, and harbor ill-will toward the biased media. But rather than work through the garbage and distortions in the pipeline, the disengaged retire from the game altogether.

Obviously, these two groups are kissing cousins. In total, 35% of adults fit one or both of those categories.

Their ambivalence is obvious when you see that:

  • They are less likely to feel angry about the state of the nation: 47% vs. 70% among other adults
  • They are less likely to have an opinion about President Trump’s current job performance
  • They are more than twice as likely as other Americans to give President Trump a middling grade (a “C”) or to have no opinion about his first year’s performance in office
  • They are much less likely to claim that they are actively working for the positive transformation of American society

Why are such bland feelings and lack of participation a problem to harp on? Because, unfortunately, this group of absentee citizens may hold the future of our nation in their hands.

We are essentially in a political impasse and they hold the tiebreaking vote. Imagine if the U.S. Senate had an evenly-divided floor vote and the Vice President refused to show up to cast the deciding ballot. What would we call the VP? Irresponsible. Abandoning his civic duty. Wreckless. Uncaring. Derelict in his duties.

Conservatives and liberals want to change America. But the Disengaged, through their apathy and ignorance, are effectively destroying it.

Let me make this even clearer. The latest ACFI survey asked people to summarize their feelings about capitalism, socialism, and democracy.

Republicans, Democrats, conservatives, and liberals agree on very little. But three-quarters of them expressed positive feelings about democracy. The Disengaged? Just 37% of them had positive feelings about the basis of American civic life. A majority said they were either undecided on the matter or had no feelings at all.

When asked to make a choice between capitalism and socialism, conservatives overwhelmingly opted for capitalism, liberals vied for socialism. The Disengaged? A majority of them (56%) said they had no preference.

Part of the challenge may be their lack of information. Whereas two-thirds of the engaged population follows news about politics and governance “a lot” or “quite a bit,” few of those who are Disengaged pay attention to such information.

These are the people who don’t know and don’t care. Their failure to participate in the battle for the nation’s future is paralyzing us all.

On the one hand, I hate to have these cultural sluggards shift the direction of the nation one way or the other. Will they be as irresponsible in their choices as they have been through their disengagement?

On the other hand, if they do not engage, without vibrant leaders suddenly emerging to put the nation on course, we will all continue to suffer. If the Disengaged would man-up and uphold their civic duty to participate in national life, we could break out of our political paralysis.

Wouldn’t it be better for the nation to move forward than to continue our agonizing slide into the quicksand of ambivalence and throes of political chaos?

If you are among the one out of every three Americans who fit the description of the Disengaged, would you please invest yourself in your own (and everyone else’s) future by getting involved in the society around you? We know you’re busy and overwhelmed; the rest of us are, too. Hiding from cultural controversies or not “taking a stand” is not helping you or your countrymen. There is no real value in staying neutral. Please, spend a little time studying the state of the union and the opportunities and challenges that lie before us. Figure out what you believe and how to translate those views into positive action.

No, you don’t have to be a brain surgeon or rocket scientist to take your obligation to your country and freedom seriously. Less than one percent of us are in those heady professions yet we’re engaged in the admittedly messy sociopolitical process, trying our ragged best to make the world a better place. We need your help!

About the Author

George Barna is the Executive Director of the American Culture and Faith Institute.

 

The Rushmore Report – 15 Worst Predictions of All Time

There is an old saying that goes, “Predicting the future is easy; getting it right is the hard part.” As we look back on American history, we find all sorts of Nostradamus-wannabes who tried to predict how the future of technology would play out. Below are 15 such predictions that are among the worst predictions ever made.

1876: “The Americans have need of the telephone, but we do not. We have plenty of messenger boys.” (William Preece, British Post Office)

1876: “This ‘telephone’ has too many shortcomings to be seriously considered as a means of communication.” (William Orton, President of Western Union)

1889: “Fooling around with alternating current (AC) is just a waste of time. Nobody will use it. Ever.” (Thomas Edison)

1903: “The horse is here to stay; the automobile is only a novelty – a fad.” (President of the Michigan Savings Bank advising Henry Ford’s lawyer, Horace Rackham, to not invest in the Ford Motor Company)

1921: “The wireless music box has no imaginable commercial value. Who would pay for a message sent to no one in particular?” (Multiple sources)

1946: “Television won’t be able to hold on to any market it captures after the first six months. People will soon get tired of staring at a plywood box every night.” (Darryl Zanuck, 20th Century Fox)

1955: “Nuclear powered vacuum cleaners will probably be a reality within ten years.” (Alex Lewyt, President of the Lewyt Vacuum Cleaner Company)

1959: “Before man reaches the moon, your mail will be delivered within hours from New York to Australia by guided missiles. We stand on the threshold of rocket mail.” (Arthur Summerfield, U.S. Postmaster General)

1961: “There is practically no chance communications space satellites will be used to provide better telephone, telegraph, television, or radio service inside the United States.” (T.A.M. Craven, Federal Communications Commission commissioner)

1966: “Remote shopping, while entirely feasible, will flop.” (Time Magazine)

1981: “Cellular phones will absolutely not replace local wire systems.” (Marty Cooper, inventor)

1995: “I predict the Internet will soon go spectacularly supernova and in 1996 catastrophically collapse.” (Robert Metcalfe, founder of 3Com)

2005: “There’s just not that many videos I want to watch.” (Steve Chen, CTO and co-founder of YouTube, explaining why his venture would have little success)

2006: “Everyone’s always asking me when Apple will come out with a cell phone. My answer is, ‘Probably never.'” (David Pogue, The New York Times)

2007: “There’s no chance that the iPhone is going to get any significant market share.” (Steve Ballmer, Microsoft CEO)

About the Author

Robert J. Szczerba is a contributor to Forbes.

The Rushmore Report – How Religious Are Liberal Senators?

A Democratic member of Congress has urged progressives in politics to “bring their faith to work” and be more open about their religious beliefs. Senator Chris Coons of Delaware and Republican Senator James Lankford of Oklahoma were recent guests on the Church Politics podcast, where they shared their views on politics and religion.

Coons explained that he was concerned that many Christians in the progressive movement were not being open about their beliefs. “I am concerned, frankly, that more and more Democrats feel embarrassed about or uncomfortable with sharing anything about their faith and how it connects to their service,” said Coons.

He continued, “Some of the most progressive members of the Senate, members I’m very close to, don’t ever talk about how it was their experience of faith, when they were children, that motivated them to get into public service and politics in the first place.”

Coons added that he thought “many of their constituents would be very surprised to hear their deeply held religious views and how in particular the radical justice that the Gospel focuses on is really what motivated them to be involved in service in the first place.”

Coons’ comments came in response to a report released last July by Pew’s U.S. Politics & Policy department, which found that 36 percent of Democrats in general and 44 percent self-identified liberal Democrats believe that churches’ impact on society is negative.

“Liberal Democrats are about as likely to say the impact of churches and religious organizations is negative (44%) as they are to say it is positive (40%). By two-to-one (58% to 29%), more conservative and moderate Democrats say churches have a positive, rather than negative effect on the country,” noted Pew in their 2017 report.

The report also found that “majorities of both conservative Republicans and Republican leaners (75%) and moderate and liberal Republicans (68%) say churches and religious organizations have a positive impact.”

The podcast interviewed Coons and Lankford not long after the two senators were announced as being the co-chairs for the 2019 National Prayer Breakfast, the annual event in Washington, D.C. that features a large number of prominent political and faith leaders from across the world.

The National Prayer Breakfast event is derived from weekly prayer meetings that members of Congress hold.

Lankford talked about the value of those weekly prayer breakfasts on the podcast, saying that they allow for building relationships across partisan borders.

“It’s a very private time and it’s a time that’s reserved just for senators. So there’s no other staff there. There’s no outside entity. It’s just senators and former senators that have the opportunity to be able to sit down and be able to talk about how we are really doing personally,” explained Lankford.

“That does change the dynamic of the conversations. When you get to know someone, their background, what drives them, who they are as a person, you get to know more about their family, and it does affect you. It is very easy in normal political life to demonize an individual based on how they vote and you just try to create a persona that’s not real. This is trying to be able to move beyond the persona.”

About the Author

Michael Gryboski writes for The Christian Post.

The Rushmore Report – At Billy Graham’s Funeral, Daughter Anne Graham Lotz Calls Church to ‘Wake Up’

Under a large white tent evoking her father’s “Canvas Cathedral” revival nearly seven decades ago, Anne Graham Lotz urged the Church, the world, and herself to “wake up!” as she joined her siblings and some 2,000 others at the funeral of her iconic evangelist father, Billy Graham, in Charlotte, North Carolina, on Friday.

“I believe, from heaven’s perspective, that my father’s death is as significant as his life. And his life was very significant. But I think when he died, that was something very strategic from heaven’s point of view,” Lotz said about her father’s passing.

The world-renowned evangelist is credited with inspiring more than three million people to commit their lives to Christ in a ministry that spanned 185 of the world’s 195 countries, according to the Billy Graham Evangelistic Association.

Like a modern-day Moses, Lotz said her father brought liberation to people through the Gospel and she sincerely believes her father’s death on February 21 at the age of 99 “is a shot across the bow from heaven.”

“My father also is a great liberator. He brought millions of people out of bondage to sin and it gets us to the edge of heaven, edge of the Promised Land, and then God has called him home. And could it be that God is going to bring Joshua to lead us into the Promised Land to lead us to heaven?” Lotz mused.

“And do you know what the New Testament name is for Joshua? It’s Jesus. And I believe this is a shot across the bow from heaven. And I believe God is saying, ‘Wake up Church! Wake up world! Wake up Anne! Jesus is coming. Jesus is coming,” she said, pledging to preach God’s Word for the rest of her life.

Donald J. Wilton, of First Baptist Church in Spartanburg, South Carolina, who was Graham’s longtime pastor, recalled Graham’s deep belief in the Bible he loved and how “it governed how he lived, and it governed how he died.”

Graham’s son, the Rev. Franklin Graham, who serves as president of the Billy Graham Evangelistic Association, said in the main address that his father believed every word of the Bible even though he never understood all of it.

He praised his father for the love he had for his late mother and noted that “the Billy Graham that the world saw on television, the Billy Graham that the world saw in the big stadium was the same Billy Graham that we saw at home. There weren’t two Billy Grahams.”

About the Author

Leonardo Blair writes for The Christian Post.

The Rushmore Report – Let’s Limit Spending Already

Some people have called for a balanced budget amendment to the Constitution as a means of reining in a big-spending Congress. That’s a misguided vision, for the simple reason that in any real economic sense, as opposed to an accounting sense, the federal budget is always balanced. The value of what we produced in 2017 – our gross domestic product – totaled about $19 trillion. If the Congress spent $4 trillion of the $19 trillion that we produced, unless you believe in Santa Clause, you know that Congress must force us to spend $4 trillion less privately.

Taxing is one way that Congress can do that. But federal revenue estimates for 2017 are about $3.5 trillion, leaving an accounting deficit of about $500 billion. So taxes are not enough to cover Congress’ spending. Another way Congress can get us to spend less privately is to enter the bond market. It can borrow. Borrowing forces up interest rates and crowds our private investment. Finally, the most dishonest way to get us to spend less is to inflate our currency. Higher prices for goods and services reduce our real spending.

The bottom line is the federal budget is always balanced in any real economic sense. For those enamored with a balanced budget amendment, think about the following. Would we have greater personal liberty under a balanced federal budget with Congress spending $4 trillion and taxing us $4 trillion, or would we be freer under an unbalanced federal budget with Congress spending $2 trillion and taxing us $1 trillion? I’d prefer the unbalanced budget. The true measure of government’s impact on our lives is government spending, not government taxing.

Tax revenue is not our problem. The federal government has collected nearly 20 percent of the nation’s gross domestic product almost every year since 1960. Federal spending has exceeded 20 percent of the GDP for most of that period. Because federal spending is the problem, that’s where our focus should be. Cutting spending is politically challenging. Every spending constituency sees what it gets from government as vital, whether it be Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid recipients or farmers, poor people, educators or the military. It’s easy for members of Congress to say yes to these spending constituencies, because whether it’s Democrats or Republicans in control, they don’t face a hard and fast bottom line.

The nation needs a constitutional amendment that limits congressional spending to a fixed fraction, say 20 percent, of the GDP. It might stipulate that the limit could be exceeded only if the president declared a state of emergency and two-thirds of both houses of Congress voted to approve the spending. By the way, the Founding Fathers would be horrified by today’s congressional spending. From 1788 to the 1920s, except in wartime, federal government spending never exceeded 4 percent of our GDP.

During the early ’80s, I was a member of the National Tax Limitation Committee. Our distinguished blue-ribbon drafting committee included its founder, Lew Uhler, plus notables such as Milton Friedman, James Buchanan, Paul McCracken, Bill Niskanen, Craig Stubblebine, Robert Bork, Aaron Wildavsky, Robert Nisbet, and Robert Carleson. The U.S. Senate passed our proposed balanced budget/spending limitation amendment to the U.S. Constitution on August 4, 1982, by a bipartisan vote of 69-31, surpassing the two-thirds requirement by two votes. In the House of Representatives, the amendment was approved by a bipartisan majority (236-187), but it did not meet the two-thirds vote required by Article 5 of the Constitution. The amendment can be found in Milton and Rose Friedman’s “Tyranny of the Status Quo” or the appendix of their “Free to Choose.”

During an interview about the proposed amendment, a reporter asked why I disagreed with the committee and called for a limit of 10 percent of GDP on federal spending. I told him that if 10 percent is good enough for the Baptist Church, it ought to be good enough for the U.S. Congress.

About the Author

Walter Williams is an American economist, commentator, and academic. He is the John M. Olin distinguished Professor of Economics at George Mason University, as well as a syndicated columnist and author, known for his libertarian views. He is published by hundreds of newspapers throughout the United States.

The Rushmore Report – Mass Exodus from Blue States to Red States

While Democrats continue to claim that their policies are superior to those of Republicans, they have one overwhelming piece of evidence working against them. By unprecedented numbers, Americans are moving from Democrat-controlled states to those run by Republicans and conservative ideals.

The delineation is clear. Democrats offer higher taxes, more regulations, and resulting higher costs of living. What do Americans think about this? It’s obvious. Don’t measure their opinions by unreliable surveys – but by moving vans.

According to United Van Lines, the top ten states people are leaving include the following states, whose state legislatures are dominated by Democrats: Wisconsin, Ohio, Massachusetts, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, and Illinois. The only red states to make the list are Kentucky, Utah, and Kansas.

And the top ten states people are moving to include the red states of Idaho, South Dakota, South Carolina, North Carolina, Alabama, Nevada, and Colorado. The only solidly blue states that are receiving significant migration are Vermont, Oregon, and Washington.

Last week, CBS in San Francisco reported that the number of people leaving the ultra-liberal Bay Area has reached its highest level in more than a decade. Topping the list of reasons: high taxes, stifling regulations, and high cost of living.

Further, the cities people are leaving more than any other are all in blue states: San Francisco, New York, Los Angeles, Washington, D.C., Chicago, Detroit, Dayton, and Milwaukee. And the cities people are moving to are mostly in red states: Phoenix, Atlanta, Dallas, Nashville, Tampa, and Miami.

The American Legislative Exchange Council ranks states according to their economic performance. Eight of the top ten states are conservative, while only two are liberal.

Perhaps the most telling data that compares red states to blue states pits the nation’s two largest states against each other: reliably blue California and reliably red Texas. The Chief Executive Magazine’s annual Best and Worst States for Business surveys hundreds of CEOs each year. And for 12 years in a row, they found California to rank dead last in terms of states that are friendly to business. Texas, on the other hand, ranked first each of the past 12 years.

So which is the better place to live – red states or blue states? Based on any fair criteria, the answer is ruby-red clear.

The Rushmore Report – Let’s Limit Spending Already Copy

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About the Author

Walter Williams is an American economist, commentator, and academic. He is the John M. Olin distinguished Professor of Economics at George Mason University, as well as a syndicated columnist and author, known for his libertarian views. He is published by hundreds of newspapers throughout the United States.

The Rushmore Report – Five Christians Who Made Huge Impact in 2017

2017 was a year of change. Donald Trump became president, Russia became front page news, and the media went nuts – more so than usual. But 2017 was also a huge year for Christians and their impact on culture. Evangelicals made a real impact – perhaps more than in any year in recent memory. Here are five Christians who made the biggest difference.

1. Mike Pence

In 2017, Mike Pence went from being the governor of a mid-sized state to Vice President of the United States. For many evangelicals, Trump’s choice of Pence as his VP sealed their support for the Republican ticket. Pence made an immediate impact, breaking six ties in the Senate in his first year in office. By contrast, Joe Biden was not called upon to break a tie vote once in eight years. Pence has spoken at the March for Life and the World Summit of Persecuted Christians. He is a strong ally for the pro-life movement.

2. Steve Green

President of Hobby Lobby, Green serves as chairman of the board for the recently opened Museum of the Bible in Washington, D.C. Green is the holder of the world’s largest private collections of rare biblical artifacts. The 430,000-square-foot, $500 million museum has attracted worldwide acclaim and attention.

3. Paula White

The Florida televangelist has become known as Trump’s “God whisperer.” She rallied support for Trump among evangelicals and serves, essentially, as the president’s chief spiritual adviser. She was one of six faith leaders to speak at his inauguration. White’s influence has been credited for Trump’s position on recognizing Jerusalem as the capital of Israel.

4. Lee Strobel

In April, a documentary was released on his life. The former atheist journalist’s quest to disprove biblical accounts of the resurrection led him to a commitment to Jesus Christ. The movie highlighted Strobel’s books, such as The Case for Christ, which have rocketed to best-sellers lists, both inside and outside faith movements.

5. Beth Moore

The #MeToo hashtag spread like a wildfire this past October with women worldwide sharing their stories of how they were sexually assaulted or harassed. Beth Moore, the 60-year-old founder of Living Proof Ministries, launched her own movement, #WeToo. Moore has called out racism, misogyny, and arrogance in the church, writing, “We’ve let evil overtake the entire reputation of evangelicalism.”