The Rushmore Report – The Faith of George Bush

The 41st President of the United States died Friday night at his home in Houston at the age of 94. George Herbert Walker Bush was a quiet man who lived a life of a quiet faith. He rarely spoke out about his faith, but to him it was real. It was a faith he embraced from childhood. Last year, historian Gary Scott Smith noted that, above all, he was for all his life a man of quiet but persistent faith:

Bush was raised by devout Episcopalian parents and remained affiliated with this denomination almost his entire life. His father Prescott, a Republican senator from Connecticut, and his mother Dorothy led family worship every morning, using readings from the Episcopal Book of Common Prayer and A Diary of Private Prayer by Scottish Presbyterian theologian John Baillie. They strove to teach their children how the Bible applied to daily life. While worshiping for many years at Episcopal churches in Houston, Washington, and Kennebunkport, Maine, Bush’s theology and social policies have more in common with evangelicals than with many fellow Episcopalians.

While flying a combat mission for the Navy in September 1944, Bush’s plane was severely damaged on a bombing mission, forcing him to parachute into the Pacific Ocean south of Japan. The Japanese hunted him, but a U.S. submarine picked him up. Bush thanked God for saving his life and asked, “Why had I been spared and what did God have for me?”

Their three-year-old daughter Robin’s battle with and eventual death from leukemia in the early 1950s both tested and deepened Bush’s faith. He declared that “prayer had always been part” of his and his wife Barbara’s lives, but it became more fervent during this ordeal. “Our faith,” Bush testified, “truly sustained us.”

Bush saw God as active and all-powerful and the Bible as divinely inspired and authoritative. “One cannot be America’s President,” the Republican frequently asserted, without “the strength that your faith gives to you.” The Bible, which had helped shape America’s values and institutions, Bush attested, “has always been a great source of comfort to me.” He affirmed that Jesus was God’s divine Son and frequently referred to Christ as “our Savior.” Moreover, Bush peppered his speeches with biblical quotations, precepts, and stories to underscore his positions.

Bush’s cabinet meetings always began with prayer. The Bushes prayed together every night before going to sleep. “My husband,” Barbara declared, “prays and believes enormously.” During his presidency, Bush referred to prayer in 220 different speeches, proclamations, and remarks. In hundreds of letters Bush thanked citizens for praying for him and testified that he drew “great strength” from their prayers.

Consider the beginning of Bush’s first inaugural address, which bears the eloquent touch of Peggy Noonan — and reminds us of the kind of honest piety and simple grace that is now so rarely heard from our leaders:

We meet on democracy’s front porch. A good place to talk as neighbors and as friends. For this is a day when our nation is made whole, when our differences, for a moment, are suspended. And my first act as President is a prayer. I ask you to bow your heads.

Heavenly Father, we bow our heads and thank You for Your love. Accept our thanks for the peace that yields this day and the shared faith that makes its continuance likely. Make us strong to do Your work, willing to heed and hear Your will, and write on our hearts these words: “Use power to help people.” For we are given power not to advance our own purposes, nor to make a great show in the world, nor a name. There is but one just use of power, and it is to serve people. Help us remember, Lord. Amen.

He concluded with these words:

There is much to do. And tomorrow the work begins. And I do not mistrust the future. I do not fear what is ahead. For our problems are large, but our heart is larger. Our challenges are great, but our will is greater. And if our flaws are endless, God’s love is truly boundless.

Some see leadership as high drama and the sound of trumpets calling, and sometimes it is that. But I see history as a book with many pages, and each day we fill a page with acts of hopefulness and meaning. The new breeze blows, a page turns, the story unfolds. And so, today a chapter begins, a small and stately story of unity, diversity, and generosity — shared, and written, together.

May the Lord bless him and keep him.

From the Book of Common Prayer:

O Almighty God, the God of the spirits of all flesh, who by a voice from heaven didst proclaim, Blessed are the dead who die in the Lord: Multiply, we beseech thee, to those who rest in Jesus the manifold blessings of thy love, that the good work which thou didst begin in them may be made perfect unto the day of Jesus Christ. And of thy mercy, O heavenly Father, grant that we, who now serve thee on earth, may at last, together with them, be partakers of the inheritance of the saints in light; for the sake of thy Son Jesus Christ our Lord.

Eternal rest grant unto him, O Lord … 

About the Author

Deacon Greg Kandra is a Roman Catholic deacon in the Diocese of Brooklyn, New York. He is a husband, deacon, journalist, writer, preacher, coffee addict, and frequent blogger with a national following.

The Rushmore Report – Barna: The Christians Who Vote for Trump Don’t Pray for Him

The Christians that the Barna Group believes were key to President Donald Trump’s 2016 victory, due to their movement away from Democrats, do not largely pray for the commander-in-chief, according to the evangelical research organization. Earlier this month, Barna released a report that included a compilation of recent research that they conducted on various politics-related issues.

Among their findings, Barna reported that as of early 2017, around the time Trump was sworn in as president, 37 percent of American adults said they pray for the president.

“Evangelicals were the group most active in their prayer, along with majorities of groups with an active Christian faith,” noted Barna earlier this month.

“These prayers were just as common among black Americans as among white Americans, but less common among those who profess a non-Christian faith or fall into the category of notional Christians.”

Barna defines “notional Christians” as people who identify as Christian and likely attend church, but do not consider themselves to be “born-again.”

Barna found that while their research indicated that “Notional Christians” were a key factor in Trump being elected, only 35 percent report praying for the president.

According to Barna’s post-election report, “perhaps the most significant faith group in relation to the Trump triumph was notional Christians. These individuals … have supported the Democratic candidate in every election since 1996. On average, notionals have given the Democratic candidate 58 percent of their votes. That trend was broken this year as Hillary Clinton took just 47 percent of the group’s votes while Trump was awarded 49 percent. Given that notionals are by far the largest of the five faith segments, that transition was a game changer for the Republicans.”

Among evangelical Christians, a group that strongly supported Trump, 88 percent reported praying for Trump. By contrast, 18 percent of non-Christian religious believers reported praying for the president.

Unlike most polling on evangelicals, Barna defines evangelicals based upon beliefs, a set of nine questions, rather than self-identification.

Barna drew from a 2017 survey of 1,109 American adults with a sampling error of plus or minus 2.9 percent.

The survey was one of multiple recent findings that Barna highlighted in response to the midterm elections, with the organization explaining that they believed this and other findings “may help provide context—or prompt more questions—about our present political moment.”

Last year, it was reported that some theologically liberal churches, All Saints Episcopal Church of Pasadena, California among them, were going to refuse to state Trump’s name in their prayers for him.

“We are in a unique situation in my lifetime where we have a president elect whose name is literally a trauma trigger to some people,” said All Saints Church Rector Mike Kinman, as reported by local media outlet Pasadena NOW in 2017.

“Whereas before we prayed for ‘Barack, our president,’ we are now praying for ‘our president, our president elect, and all others in authority.’ This practice will continue for at least the near future.”

The Rev. Alice Rose Tewell, associate pastor at The New York Avenue Presbyterian Church in Washington, D.C., told The Christian Post in an interview last year that her congregation will “pray for our political leaders from all backgrounds during our worship service.”

“We have and we will continue to pray that our next president would act on with justice and mercy for each person throughout our nation and the world,” said Tewell.

“We pray that our next president will turn from the rhetoric of his campaign and instead stand up for the rights of the immigrant and refugee, the rights of women and children, the rights of people of color, the rights of those who live with disabilities, the rights of the LGBTQ community, for the rights of those living without homes or in unstable conditions, and for all who are lack enough opportunity, chances at a good education, and healthcare.”

About the Author

Michael Gryboski writes for the Christian Post. Follow Michael Gryboski on Twitter or Facebook

The Rushmore Report – How to Pray for Today’s Elections

Today’s elections will determine the control of Congress – both in the House and the Senate. Thousands of other candidates will be on the ballot across the country. I’m sure I don’t need to convince you to vote. And as followers of Christ, we certainly understand that we should pray. In fact, it is more important to pray right than it is to vote right. The good news is that God hears our prayers. So it is important that we know how to pray.

I suggest five keys to effective election prayers.

1. Pray for a national revival.

God will bless America when America blesses God. We need the healing and revival of God across the land. Those timeless words of the Old Testament ring true: “If my people, who are called by my name, will humble themselves and pray and seek my face and turn from their wicked ways, then I will hear from heaven, and I will forgive their sin and I will heal their land” (2 Chronicles 7:14).

2. Pray for our leaders.

Commit to this, win or lose. Pray that God will give our leaders wisdom and courage to seek him and lead us. Paul told Timothy, “I urge, then, first of all, that petitions, prayers, intercession and thanksgiving be made for all people – for kings and all those in authority, that we may live peaceful and quiet lives in all godliness and holiness” (1 Timothy 2:1-2).

3. Pray for God’s sovereignty.

In all things, pray for God’s will. Pray for his perfect plan to be carried out through the men and women who will be elected. The Bible says, “It is God who changes the times and seasons; he sets up kings and deposes them. He gives wisdom to the wise and knowledge to the discerning” (Daniel 2:21).

4. Pray for the real battle.

Our battle is not political, but spiritual. Revival never begins in the White House, but in God’s house. We are in a fight against evil as we defend the faith. Paul said it like this: “Our struggle is not against flesh and blood, but against the rulers, against the authorities, against the powers of this dark world and against the spiritual forces of evil in the heavenly realm” (Ephesians 6:12).

5. Pray that the church recognizes her true hope.

We must trust that God is able to do what man cannot do. The key to our joy and hope is not in the economy or certain political policies. Our hope was, is, and will always be, in the Lord. The prophet said it well: “Look at the nations and watch – and be utterly amazed. For I am going to do something in your days that you would not believe, even if you were told” (Habakkuk 1:5).

The Rushmore Report – Senate Chaplain Has Strong Words for Christians

Barry Black is the 62nd chaplain of the United States Senate. He was elected to this position on June 27, 2003, becoming the first African American and the first Seventh-day Adventist to hold this coveted office. Born in 1948, Black earned multiple awards for his service in the United States Navy, where he served as chaplain for 27 years. And now the Senate Chaplain has delivered a message to American believers. And he was direct with his message.

Black said he believes that the United States has a “serious problem” when it comes to political civility and that Christians should be leading the way in ushering civility back into society.

Having served the Senate for 15 years, the retired Navy officer spoke with the Christian Broadcasting Network regarding his concerns about the increasing tension and political incivility that is seemingly toxifying public discourse in America.

“When, because of political differences, people can’t with their families enjoy the freedoms that this nation provides, we’ve got a serious problem,” Black told the news outlet.

In a time in which Trump administration officials are being kicked out of restaurants and harassed, and lawmakers are engaging in heated back-and-forth attacks on Twitter, Black says that a lot of the incivility on display today has to do with “arrogance, swagger, and trash talking.”

The chaplain concluded his remarks with a quote from Scripture.

“I think it’s critically important that we lower the decibels. Proverbs 15:1 says, ‘A soft answer turns away anger.’ We need to return to obeying the Golden Rule.”

About the Author

Samuel Smith writes for the Christian Post.

The Rushmore Report – The Very Simple Reason Evangelicals Are Sticking with Trump

He has been married three times. He has admitted to multiple affairs. His use of crude language is indisputable. He is not an active church person. Yet, President Donald Trump enjoys record support among Americans known as evangelicals – men and woman devoted to Jesus Christ as Savior and Lord. Christian leaders such as Franklin Graham and Jerry Falwell, Jr. acclaim him as the greatest friend Christians have ever had in the White House. Last week’s poll by YouGov found that those who self identify as “born again” support the president by a majority of 87-13 percent. Yet, only 45 percent of this group approve of the president’s personal behavior. So what gives? How come Christ followers support President Trump by greater numbers than for Ronald Reagan or George W. Bush? The answer is actually quite simple.

We have President Trump for no more than eight years. But we will have the ramifications of his policies for decades.

It is certainly understandable that many see this as the definition of hypocrisy. Here we have a sitting president who has been tied to an affair with a porn star, and his greatest defenders are evangelical leaders. What could be a greater disconnect than that?

But keep in mind, while Trump only has about a 45 percent approval rating, that trumps the media’s 24 percent trustworthy rating (CBS survey).

The CBS poll found that by an overwhelming majority, people find Trump’s behavior unbecoming of a president. But it also found that most people vote based on policy, not personality – or so they say.

So this is where most evangelicals stand. They would rather have a president with questionable character who delivers lower taxes, stronger defense, secure borders, religious freedom, a growing economy, conservative judges, low inflation, a rising stock market, and more jobs – than a president who is a great Sunday school teacher, but leads the country to a weakened national defense, higher taxes, porous borders, liberal judges, and higher unemployment.

The way evangelicals look at it is that in ten years, we won’t have Trump around. But we will have the result of his policies. And they are willing to put up with some personal issues with which they disagree for the sake of the long term good of the country.

For those who like to see ISIS on the run, North Korea discussing a reduction in its nuclear threat, Russia under economic sanctions, lower taxes, conservative judges, low unemployment, stronger national defense, secure borders, record jobs, and a soaring stock market – evangelicals make a good point.

Evangelicals are sticking with Trump. The reason is quite simple.

The Rushmore Report – Seven Leading Evangelicals Respond to Kavanaugh Nomination

It has been one week since Brett Kavanaugh was nominated for the Supreme Court. When President Obama nominated two liberal justices to the highest court, most Republicans affirmed his choices. But Democrats were nearly unanimous in their opposition to Kavanaugh – even before they knew who the nominee would be. But what is the Christian response? Seven leading evangelicals have now spoken.

1. Jack Graham

The pastor of Dallas’ Prestonwood church said, “My sincere congratulations to Judge Brett Kavanaugh for his nomination to the Supreme Court. I’m thankful we have a president who has remained true to his word. This is another checkmark in a long list of promises President Trump has kept. My prayer is that our next justice may not only be in the mold of the late Justice Antonin Scalia, but also is in the mold of a man of God.”

2. Franklin Graham

President of the Billy Graham Evangelistic Association, Graham congratulated Kavanaugh “on this monumentally important nomination. Those on the progressive, socialist left are of course already enraged. Another conservative justice threatens their agendas and the direction they were trying to push this country. We need to thank God for this long-awaited opportunity to change the make-up of the Supreme Court.”

3. Greg Laurie

Senior pastor of Harvest Christian Fellowship in Riverdale, California, Laurie said, “Throughout our nation’s history, our Supreme Court has been consequential in protecting our liberties from those who have either misunderstood or misused liberty.” He then called on God to “grant Judge Kavanaugh his wisdom to continue this proud legacy of defending our unalienable rights, and may God give him favor for a speedy and fair confirmation.”

4. Samuel Rodriguez

The president of the National Hispanic Christian Leadership Conference was thrilled with Trump’s nomination. He said, “I join millions of Americans in congratulating Judge Kavanaugh for his nomination, as a well-respected jurist widely regarded for his intellect, temperament, and dedication to the Constitution. I pray for our country in this process, that instead of yet another vitriolic and divisive political battle, the confirmation process would instead be a reaffirmation of the strength of our democracy and its institutions.”

5. David Jeremiah

The pastor of Shadow Mountain Community Church in El Cajon, Califonia thanked Trump for making “another excellent selection and for another fulfilled promise.” Jeremiah continued, “This nomination will usher in a new era on the Supreme Court, one that will defend the God-given rights of all Americans, as articulated in our Constitution. It is a reaffirmation of the founding and enduring values of our nation.”

6. Tony Perkins

As head of the Family Research Council, Perkins hailed Trump for “following through” and selecting a nominee from the list he presented during his presidential campaign. He said, “Under the Obama administration, we saw a growing assault on religious freedom and the courts became a battleground for secularists seeking to remove faith from the public square. Judge Kavanaugh resisted this trend in at least two instances. We are committed to working with President Trump and U.S. senators to help move the grassroots to gain the confirmation of Judge Kavanaugh.”

7. Jerry Johnson

The president and CEO of National Religious Broadcasters urged supporters to “pray fervently and to work tirelessly for the confirmation of Judge Kavanaugh.” Johnson continued, “With outstanding credentials and a track record that reveals a judicial philosophy honoring the Constitution, Kavanaugh should sail through the Senate on the basis of merit. Leading Democrats have signaled they may attempt to obstruct consideration of Judge Kavanaugh. Instead, they should stand above the fray and the uncivilized tactics of the radical Left.”

The Rushmore Report – Awesome Christian Quotes by U.S. Presidents

Historians disagree on how “Christian” America was and is. One thing is for sure. Throughout our history, our presidents have often stood on biblical principles. You don’t have to take my word for it. Consider some of these direct quotes from some of our most popular leaders. Their words speak for themselves.

George Washington – “It is impossible to rightly govern a nation without God and the Bible.”

John Adams – “We recognize no sovereign but God, and no King but Jesus!”

John Quincy Adams – “The Bible is the first and almost the only book deserving of universal attention.”

James Monroe – “Before any man can be considered as a member of civil society, he must be considered as a subject of the Governor of the Universe. And to the same Divine Author of every good and perfect gift we are indebted for all those privileges and advantages, religious as well as civil, which are so richly enjoyed in this favored land.”

Andrew Jackson – “My most fervent prayer is that the Almighty will overrule all my intentions and actions.”

Abraham Lincoln – “I am profitably engaged in reading the Bible. Take all of this Book upon reason that you can, and the balance by faith, and you will live and die a better man.”

Grover Cleveland – “All must admit that the reception of the teachings of Christ result in the purest patriotism, in the most scrupulous fidelity to public trust, and in the best type of citizenship.”

Theodore Roosevelt – “A thorough knowledge of the Bible is worth more than a college education.”

Calvin Coolidge – “The foundation of our country is the Word of God.”

Herbert Hoover – “The study of the Bible is a post-graduate course in the richest library of human experience.”

John F. Kennedy – “The rights of man come not from the generosity of the state but from the hand of God.”

Ronald Reagan – “If we ever forget that we are one nation under God, then we will be a nation gone under.”

George H. W. Bush – “We asked for God’s help; and now, in this shining outcome, in this magnificent triumph of good over evil, we should thank God.”

George W. Bush – “Each day millions of our citizens approach our Maker on bended knee, seeking his grace and giving thanks for the many blessings he bestows upon us.”

The Rushmore Report – How Religious Are Liberal Senators?

A Democratic member of Congress has urged progressives in politics to “bring their faith to work” and be more open about their religious beliefs. Senator Chris Coons of Delaware and Republican Senator James Lankford of Oklahoma were recent guests on the Church Politics podcast, where they shared their views on politics and religion.

Coons explained that he was concerned that many Christians in the progressive movement were not being open about their beliefs. “I am concerned, frankly, that more and more Democrats feel embarrassed about or uncomfortable with sharing anything about their faith and how it connects to their service,” said Coons.

He continued, “Some of the most progressive members of the Senate, members I’m very close to, don’t ever talk about how it was their experience of faith, when they were children, that motivated them to get into public service and politics in the first place.”

Coons added that he thought “many of their constituents would be very surprised to hear their deeply held religious views and how in particular the radical justice that the Gospel focuses on is really what motivated them to be involved in service in the first place.”

Coons’ comments came in response to a report released last July by Pew’s U.S. Politics & Policy department, which found that 36 percent of Democrats in general and 44 percent self-identified liberal Democrats believe that churches’ impact on society is negative.

“Liberal Democrats are about as likely to say the impact of churches and religious organizations is negative (44%) as they are to say it is positive (40%). By two-to-one (58% to 29%), more conservative and moderate Democrats say churches have a positive, rather than negative effect on the country,” noted Pew in their 2017 report.

The report also found that “majorities of both conservative Republicans and Republican leaners (75%) and moderate and liberal Republicans (68%) say churches and religious organizations have a positive impact.”

The podcast interviewed Coons and Lankford not long after the two senators were announced as being the co-chairs for the 2019 National Prayer Breakfast, the annual event in Washington, D.C. that features a large number of prominent political and faith leaders from across the world.

The National Prayer Breakfast event is derived from weekly prayer meetings that members of Congress hold.

Lankford talked about the value of those weekly prayer breakfasts on the podcast, saying that they allow for building relationships across partisan borders.

“It’s a very private time and it’s a time that’s reserved just for senators. So there’s no other staff there. There’s no outside entity. It’s just senators and former senators that have the opportunity to be able to sit down and be able to talk about how we are really doing personally,” explained Lankford.

“That does change the dynamic of the conversations. When you get to know someone, their background, what drives them, who they are as a person, you get to know more about their family, and it does affect you. It is very easy in normal political life to demonize an individual based on how they vote and you just try to create a persona that’s not real. This is trying to be able to move beyond the persona.”

About the Author

Michael Gryboski writes for The Christian Post.

The Rushmore Report – How Billy Graham Changed My Life

Billy Graham was, with C.S. Lewis, one of the 20th century’s most influential figures in evangelicalism. I never had the honor of meeting Lewis, but I did know Billy, who died last week at 99. He changed my life.

I first met him on my grandmother’s porch in Kennebunkport, Maine, in 1985. In her 80s, she was frail but sharp. They sat together and Billy held her hand while talking about the Bible. Later she described it as one of the most peaceful days of her life.

Soon after, I had my own personal encounter with Billy. As I wrote in Decision Points, he asked me to go for a walk with him around Walker’s Point. I was captivated by him. He had a powerful presence, full of kindness and grace, and a keen mind. He asked about my life in Texas. I talked to him about Laura and our little girls.

Then I mentioned something I’d been thinking about for awhile – that reading the Bible might help make me a better person. He told me about one of the Bible’s most fundamental lessons: one should strive to be better, but we’re all sinners who earn God’s love not through our good deeds, but through His grace. It was a profound concept, one I did not fully grasp that day. But Billy had planted a seed. His thoughtful explanation made the soil less hard, the brambles less thick.

Shortly after we got back to Texas, a package from Billy arrived. It was a copy of the Living Bible. He had inscribed it and included a reference to Philippians 1:6: “And I am certain that God, who began the good work within you, will continue his work until it is finally finished on the day when Christ Jesus returns.”

God’s work within me began in earnest with Billy’s outreach. His care and his teachings were the real beginning of my faith walk – and the start of the end of my drinking. I couldn’t have given up alcohol on my own. But in 1986, at 40, I finally found the strength to quit. That strength came from love I had felt from my earliest days and from faith I didn’t fully discover until my later years.

I was also fortunate to witness Billy’s remarkable capacity to minister to everyone he met. When I was governor of Texas, I sat behind Billy at one of his crusades in San Antonio. His powerful message of God’s love moved people to tears and motivated hundreds to come forward to commit themselves to Christ. I remember thinking about all the crusades Billy had led over the years around the world, and his capacity to open up hearts to Jesus. This good man was truly a shepherd of the Lord.

Perhaps his most meaningful service came on September 14, 2001. After the 9/11 attacks, I asked Billy to lead the ecumenical service at Washington National Cathedral. It was no easy task. America was on bended knee – frightened, angry, uncertain. As only Billy Graham could, he helped us feel God’s arms wrapped around our mourning country.

“We come together today,” he began, “to affirm our conviction that God cares for us, whatever our ethnic, religious or political background may be. The Bible says that he is ‘the God of all comfort, who comforts us in all our troubles.'” God comforted a nation that day through a very special servant.

In a difficult moment, Billy reminded me – and all of us – where we can find strength. And he helped us start to heal by offering three lessons: the mystery and reality of evil, our need for each other, and hope for the present and future. “As a Christian,” Graham said at the 9/11 service, “I have hope, not just for this life, but for heaven and the life to come.”

A final story: One night while dad was away on a trip during his presidency, mother and I had dinner at the White House. Eventually we got to talking about religion and who gets to go to heaven. I made the point that the New Testament says clearly that to get to heaven, one must believe in Christ. Mother asked about the devout who don’t believe in Jesus but do God’s work by serving others. She then took advantage of one of the benefits of being first lady. She picked up the phone and asked the White House operator to call Reverend Graham.

It wasn’t long before his reassuring Southern voice was on the line. He told us, as I recall, “Barbara and George, I believe what is written in the New Testament. But don’t play God. He decides who goes to heaven, not you.” Any doctrinal certitude gave way to a calm trust that God had this figured out better than I did.

Those of us who were blessed to know Billy Graham benefited from his deep convictions and personal example, his wisdom and humility, his grace and purity of heart. We knew that his life was a gift from the Almighty. And I rejoice that he is now in the company of God, whom he loved so much and served so well.

About the Author

George W. Bush served as the 43rd President of the United States.

The Rushmore Report: What Marco Rubio Is Doing that Is Driving His Critics Nuts

Senator Marco Rubio (R-FL) has long confounded his critics. He is an unabashed conservative in the ultimate swing state. He is pro-immigration, but in a way that supports border security. His star shines brightest among young Republicans who are likely to dominate the national stage for the next 20 years. But there is one thing Senator Rubio keeps doing that is driving his critics nuts.

Marco Rubio has a Twitter page, and he knows how to use it. Every day, he uses this platform to promote Biblical principles and family values. Specifically, he tweets verses from Scripture, mostly Proverbs. And the people with nothing better to do – at the Freedom From Religion Foundation – are demanding that he stop.

While other politicians might respond politically, that is not Rubio’s style. He insists, “I’ll continue to do it. If they don’t like it they don’t have to follow me on Twitter.” He continued, “Faith is the single biggest influence on my life, and it’s a positive influence.”

In late August, the Freedom From Religion Foundation, America’s largest atheist organization, charged that Rubio is in violation of the U.S. Constitution. Attorney Andrew L. Seidel wrote, “It appears that you began tweeting the Bible in mid-May and have been doing so regularly ever since. This is not an errant Bible verse or two, but more than 60 Bible verses in three months. That’s enough verses to tweet the entire Book of Jude twice.”

A trained lawyer himself, Rubio has only continued the practice in the face of such criticism. He recently posted Proverbs 18:2, which says, “Fools take no delight in understanding, but only in displaying what they think.” That didn’t go over particularly well with his critics.

In July, Politico posted an op-ed suggesting that Rubio only tweets the “Republican” parts of the Bible. Rubio’s response was classic. He tweeted, “Proverbs is the Republican part of the Bible? I didn’t know that Solomon had yet joined the Republican Party when he wrote the first 29 chapters of Proverbs.”

Will Senator Rubio continue to uphold Scripture and tweet Bible verses? Yes. And will the nutwings at the Freedom From Religion Foundation continue to whine about it? Of course they will. After all, what could be more offensive than quoting the timeless words of the wisdom of Solomon, that great old Republican King of Israel?